The New York Times

Winners and Losers of the Democratic Debate

Welcome to Opinion’s commentary for the Dec. 19 Democratic presidential candidate debate in Los Angeles. In this special feature, Times Opinion writers rank the candidates on a scale of 1 to 10: 1 means the candidate probably didn’t belong on the stage and should probably drop out; 10 means it’s on, President Trump. Here’s what our columnists and contributors thought about the debate.

Read what our columnists and contributors thought of the November debate.

Amy Klobuchar7.1/10Average score

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Took aim at the candidate most in her way: Pete Buttigieg.

— Jamelle Bouie

Has yet to appear presidential.

— Bianca Vivion Brooks

Better, but still too earnest and self-centered.

— Jorge Castañeda

Time for an upgrade.

— Gail Collins

A stage-seizing performance.

— Ross Douthat

Klobuchar’s got jokes, but she’s also got jabs.

— Nicole Hemmer

Jousted with good cheer and optimism.

— Nicholas Kristof

Stay big.

— David Leonhardt

Virtually flawless debate.

— Liz Mair

She gets more appealing over time.

— Daniel McCarthy

By the way, she’s from the Midwest. The Midwest.

— Miriam Pawel

She was the Tulsi Gabbard of tonight’s debate.

— Melanye Price

Stasis in the polls is mystifying.

— Mimi Swartz

She’d be the debate winner if the election were taking place in 1980 instead of 2020.

— Héctor Tobar

She helped herself in Iowa.

— Will Wilkinson

Jamelle Bouie (8/10) — To have any chance at the nomination, Klobuchar needs to win Iowa, and so she took aim at the candidate most in her way — Pete Buttigieg — presenting herself as the experienced alternative to a small town mayor with only a few electoral wins under his belt. It was compelling.

Bianca Vivion Brooks (2/10) — She relied on platitudes and has yet to appear presidential in the slightest.

Jorge Castañeda (8/10) — Klobuchar was better than before, but still too earnest and self-centered, even by candidates’ standards. Her best moments were on Citizens United and how Trump quits when his peers make fun of him.

Gail Collins (8/10) — She’s been great at the clever, sensible answers for a while now. Time for an upgrade.

Ross Douthat (7/10) — Her most forceful, stage-seizing performance. The only question is whether enough Iowans liked the deliberate clash with Buttigieg.

Nicole Hemmer (7/10) — Klobuchar’s got jokes, but she’s also got jabs, and tonight she aimed almost all of them at Buttigieg, in an effective bid for voters looking for a non-wine-cave Midwesterner.

Nicholas Kristof (10/10) — Effectively presented herself as a unifier who can win elections, jousting with good cheer and optimism.

David Leonhardt (6/10) — She’s getting better, but still sounds too much like a senator and not a president. She doesn’t need to mention all that legislation. Stay big.

Liz Mair (9.5/10) — Virtually flawless debate. She attacked effectively and came off as confident, experienced and presidential — and, yes, likable, something we’re told isn’t possible for female candidates but that she proved actually is.

Daniel McCarthy (8/10) — Tough yet good-humored, with a commanding sense of legislative possibility and reality. She gets more appealing over time and plays her Midwestern background to good effect. A top veep prospect, and maybe now a top presidential one.

Miriam Pawel (8/10) — If any debate is going to help her, this was it. She took some risks, dominated the conversation and aimed squarely at Iowa. Oh, and by the way, she’s from the Midwest. The Midwest.

Melanye Price (5/10) — It seems that any people who would support her are already committed to Buttigieg or Biden. She was the Tulsi Gabbard of tonight’s debate: She’s saying things that sort of make sense but are not quite right and we are all wondering how she continues to qualify for the debates.

Mimi Swartz (8/10) — Did well again but should stop auditioning for late-night TV with her one-liners. She’s ready and able, especially while sending Warren and Buttigieg to their rooms. Her stasis in the polls is mystifying.

Héctor Tobar (5/10) — With every comment, she tried to build her centrist, pragmatic brand — but often looked nervous doing so. When she finally got angry, it was because the people onstage were getting angry at one another. She’d be the debate winner if the election were taking place in 1980 instead of 2020.

Will Wilkinson (8/10) — The winnowing of the debate pack gave Klobuchar room to throw sharp elbows and make a compelling case for her electability and qualifications. She helped herself in Iowa.

Bernie Sanders7.1/10Average score

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More feisty and energetic than ever.

— Jamelle Bouie

He was on fire.

— Bianca Vivion Brooks

Predictable but interesting.

— Jorge Castañeda

He still does sound like a cranky uncle.

— Gail Collins

Dominated the Warren-Sanders lane.

— Ross Douthat

So much better when he’s goofy rather than grumpy.

— Nicole Hemmer

Extra credit for speaking empathetically about Palestinians.

— Nicholas Kristof

Eloquent and effective.

— David Leonhardt

You either love the Bernie show or wish he’d stop yelling.

— Liz Mair

Class consciousness still counts in an identity-politics age.

— Daniel McCarthy

Bernie was, as always, Bernie.

— Miriam Pawel

He tries to substitute class for race when we all know they are heavily correlated.

— Melanye Price

Still wearying, even when he’s right.

— Mimi Swartz

As always, he won the authenticity contest.

— Héctor Tobar

Pugnacious and charming.

— Will Wilkinson

Jamelle Bouie (8/10) — If we were giving out awards then Sanders would get “most consistent player.” He’s always good! And since his heart attack in the fall, he’s more feisty and energetic than ever.

Bianca Vivion Brooks (9/10) — Substance, sincerity and strength — he was on fire tonight.

Jorge Castañeda (7/10) — He did what he does best: bring everything back to health care and the 1 percent. His opposition to U.S.M.C.A. was predictable but interesting.

Gail Collins (7/10) — Some good and quick responses, but he still does sound like a cranky uncle.

Ross Douthat (7/10) — If there’s a Warren-or-Sanders lane, he dominated it tonight.

Nicole Hemmer (8/10) — You always know what you’re getting with Sanders, but he’s so much better when — like tonight — he’s goofy rather than grumpy.

Nicholas Kristof (8/10) — Relentless, sharp and sometimes humorous, and extra credit for speaking empathetically about Palestinians.

David Leonhardt (7/10) — I’m not a fan of universally free college, and I still thought his pitch for it — along with other universal public programs — was eloquent and effective.

Liz Mair (5/10) — You either love the Bernie show, or you wish he’d stop yelling already. It appears most Democrats don’t love it. But hey, maybe those that do will force a big fight on the convention floor and provide some entertainment for the nation next summer.

Daniel McCarthy (6/10) — You know exactly what he’s going to say, yet he says it passionately every time. His humor serves him well. He shows class consciousness still counts in an identity-politics age.

Miriam Pawel (7/10) — Bernie was, as always, Bernie, his great strength. He probably didn’t win any new converts, but he was comfortable, clear and consistent.

Melanye Price (8/10) — Bernie Sander’s decision to pivot from the racial question to talk about the environment only feeds the concerns of people of color. He tries to substitute class for race when we all know they are heavily correlated. Black and brown people are overrepresented in lower-income classes and that’s because of race and class, not just class.

Mimi Swartz (5/10) — Given our times, Cassandra Sanders is starting to sound almost reasonable. But he’s not answering questions, he’s pontificating. Still wearying, even when he’s right.

Héctor Tobar (7/10) — As always, he won the authenticity contest. But now half the people onstage are doing his angry outsider routine.

Will Wilkinson (8/10) — An under-the-radar contender in national polls was pugnacious, charming and made the clearest case so far that ordinary Americans would come out ahead with higher taxes but vastly reduced personal health care costs under Medicare for All.

Joe Biden7.0/10Average score

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Not sure if he was actually good or if this is the soft bigotry of low expectations.

— Jamelle Bouie

Not one clear answer.

— Bianca Vivion Brooks

He showed more emotion, especially on immigration and Afghanistan.

— Jorge Castañeda

Now we know he can just cope like a normal candidate.

— Gail Collins

Real front-runner energy.

— Ross Douthat

For Biden, the bar is low, but he cleared it ably tonight.

— Nicole Hemmer

Still no silver tongue, but solid for the first time.

— Nicholas Kristof

His best debate.

— David Leonhardt

Someone ate his Wheaties and drank his Red Bull.

— Liz Mair

A believable front-runner not burdened by age.

— Daniel McCarthy

His best debate — because he faded into the background.

— Miriam Pawel

In the battle between the two old white guys, Bernie seems to be winning.

— Melanye Price

Still running on the Obama record.

— Mimi Swartz

Didn’t look like a man ready to lead the Democrats into battle.

— Héctor Tobar

Fighting pep in his step.

— Will Wilkinson

Jamelle Bouie (9/10) — Biden did extremely well tonight, although I’m not sure if he was actually good or if this is the soft bigotry of low expectations. Either way, this was exactly the kind of performance he needed to stay on top in the national race and even make up ground in Iowa and New Hampshire.

Bianca Vivion Brooks (2/10) — Not one clear, straightforward or followable answer in the entire debate.

Jorge Castañeda (8/10) — Biden held his ground and did what he had to do: not lose points. He showed more emotion, especially on immigration and Afghanistan.

Gail Collins (6/10) — O.K., now we know he can just cope like a normal candidate. Please add just a tweak of magic?

Ross Douthat (8/10) — His best and most consistent debate. For the first time, he had real front-runner energy.

Nicole Hemmer (7/10) — For Biden, the bar is low — deliver coherent answers and show a bit of energy — but he cleared it ably tonight, something he hasn’t done in the past few debates.

Nicholas Kristof (9/10) — Biden’s best debate by far. Still no silver tongue, but solid for the first time, successfully conveying his experience as a strength.

David Leonhardt (8/10) — His best debate. He was passionate, mostly sharp and even funny. Although maybe a little less shouting next time.

Liz Mair (8/10) — Someone ate his Wheaties and drank his Red Bull. His final answer demonstrated Biden’s great strength — he really does love people, and that makes him really appealing.

Daniel McCarthy (6/10) — He was on form, cogent and confident, a believable front-runner not burdened by his age. If he lost any votes, it’s only because others were as solid or better.

Miriam Pawel (8/10) — Maybe his best debate — because he faded into the background. No gaffes, other than a clumsy answer to the one spontaneous question. Stuck to his mantra — experience and electability.

Melanye Price (8/10) — Biden was strong tonight, but in the battle between the two old white guys, Bernie seems to be winning. At a debate with members of his own party, Biden tells Sanders to put his hand down because it’s flustering him?

Mimi Swartz (7/10) — Stayed sharp but still seemed to be running on the Obama record more than providing a vision. A Trump-Biden debate remains a concern.

Héctor Tobar (4/10) — If he were up there by himself, you’d say: He’s doing fine. But he’s not. And next to the other candidates, he didn’t look like a man ready to lead the Democrats into battle.

Will Wilkinson (7/10) — Biden’s best performance to date. Trump’s scurrilous Biden-centric cover story for his corruption seems to have put some fighting pep in the former veep’s step.

Elizabeth Warren6.7/10Average score

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Faltered in her confrontation with Buttigieg.

— Jamelle Bouie

She stepped up.

— Bianca Vivion Brooks

She is still on a downhill slope.

— Jorge Castañeda

If you’re a frontrunner just being fine is … fine.

— Gail Collins

Strangely, almost a non-factor.

— Ross Douthat

Vibrated with passion, without drowning people in plans.

— Nicole Hemmer

Her challenge to Buttigieg backfired.

— Nicholas Kristof

Sharp in laying out her vision.

— David Leonhardt

Looked fairly desperate at points.

— Liz Mair

She’s the candy-store candidate.

— Daniel McCarthy

Best in moments speaking with spontaneity and genuine feeling.

— Miriam Pawel

Connecting her policies to values made her arguments even stronger.

— Melanye Price

She let that punk from Indiana rattle her.

— Mimi Swartz

She always seems to hit the perfect balance between outrage and compassion.

— Héctor Tobar

Made a muscular case for sticking up for the little guy.

— Will Wilkinson

Jamelle Bouie (6/10) — After taking a thrashing on Medicare for All and slipping in the polls, Warren is focusing on the anti-corruption part of her message. And like Bernie, she is relentlessly on message, able to tie almost any question back to the themes of her campaign. But she faltered in her confrontation with Buttigieg and lost some initiative.

Bianca Vivion Brooks (8/10) — Her strongest and most personable debate yet. She knew the stakes and stepped up.

Jorge Castañeda (7/10) — She is still on a downhill slope and peaked too early intellectually. I would have expected bolder stances on foreign policy, given her intellect. A missed opportunity.

Gail Collins (8/10) — If you’re a frontrunner just being fine is … fine.

Ross Douthat (4/10) — Best one-liner of the night “I’d be the youngest woman”); otherwise, strangely, almost a non-factor.

Nicole Hemmer (8/10) — She not only had the best one-liner of the night, she vibrated with passion, without drowning people in plans.

Nicholas Kristof (8/10) — Very effective in taking on the corruption of Trump and the system, but aggressively challenged Buttigieg, and it backfired.

David Leonhardt (7/10) — She had the best line of the night (“the youngest female president”). Warren is sharp in laying out her vision. Mayor Pete effectively parried her no-big-donors argument.

Liz Mair (4/10) — Warren looked fairly desperate at points tonight, almost looked like she was going to cry twice and got roughed up pretty badly, mostly by Mayor Pete. She also nearly walked into another roughing-up at the end, eyes-wide-open and who knows why.

Daniel McCarthy (3/10) — She’s the candy-store candidate, promising more than anyone can deliver, while pitching her case on sentimentality and “selfies.” She makes a poor contrast with Klobuchar’s legislative focus.

Miriam Pawel (7/10) — She stayed on message — and avoided the health care morass — but relied heavily on the same handful of talking points. She was best the few times she spoke with spontaneity and genuine feeling.

Melanye Price (9/10) — Warren was strong tonight. Connecting her policies to values made her arguments even stronger. A candidate who begins with more experience than the last three presidents — and is quick-witted and likable — is not the front-runner. Why? She is a woman.

Mimi Swartz (6/10) — “Oh, they’re just wrong” isn’t a great answer to any question. She needs a fresher way to reiterate and expand her vision, which is the clearest and most consistent. She let that punk from Indiana rattle her. Take a breath.

Héctor Tobar (8/10) — Well, she’s a fighter. No one can deny that. And maybe that’s what the party wants and what the country needs. She always seems to hit the perfect balance between outrage and compassion.

Will Wilkinson (7/10) — Warren made a muscular case for sticking up for the little guy and fighting corruption — including the soft corruption of Buttigieg’s fat cat spelunking.

Pete Buttigieg6.6/10Average score

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“Wine cave” is going to stick.

— Jamelle Bouie

Six debates too late.

— Bianca Vivion Brooks

The best debater, but not the best candidate.

— Jorge Castañeda

If only he didn’t have to defend the fund-raiser in the wine cave….

— Gail Collins

His thin résumé looked thinner.

— Ross Douthat

His wine cave is to 2020 what Romney’s car elevator was to 2012.

— Nicole Hemmer

Took incoming fire and handled it ably.

— Nicholas Kristof

High highs, but inconsistent.

— David Leonhardt

Effectively attacked Warren, and she deserved it.

— Liz Mair

Acquitted himself well as a centrist Democrat.

— Daniel McCarthy

It’s hard to recover from Wine Cave Pete.

— Miriam Pawel

It is not his time. He will be great if he keeps working at it, but not now.

— Melanye Price

Kept his dukes up and landed punches.

— Mimi Swartz

After a while, his answers sounded too practiced and polished.

— Héctor Tobar

Got seriously bloodied on wine cave.

— Will Wilkinson

Jamelle Bouie (5/10) — Buttigieg made an open defense of the extremely broken American campaign finance system, which is to say that “wine cave” is going to stick.

Bianca Vivion Brooks (5/10) — He is finally tapping into the plight of the working class — six debates too late.

Jorge Castañeda (9/10) — He defended himself notably against Warren and Klobuchar. He is the best debater, but not the best candidate.

Gail Collins (8/10) — He was the target and he held up pretty darn well. If only he didn’t have to defend the fund-raiser in the wine cave….

Ross Douthat (4/10) — The knives went in at last. Though he can fight back just fine, in a fight the thin résumé looks thinner and the smirk comes out too quickly.

Nicole Hemmer (6/10) — The other candidates finally realized they could swing at Mayor Pete, and while it wasn’t a TKO, he took a body blow on wealthy donors. His wine cave is to 2020 what Romney’s car elevator was to 2012 — an image of out-of-touch wealth that people won’t soon forget.

Nicholas Kristof (10/10) — Buttigieg took incoming fire, particularly from Elizabeth Warren, and handled it ably: He faced his biggest debate test and passed.

David Leonhardt (7/10) — High highs, but inconsistent. When replying to moderator questions, he resorted to anti-Washington cliches. When attacked, he was very good.

Liz Mair (6.5/10) — Not his best debate — he got roughed up by Klobuchar on his weakest point (not his fault; just his résumé). But he effectively attacked Warren, she deserved it, and a lot of people who think she’s grown increasingly smug, slippery and dishonest will be happy about it.

Daniel McCarthy (6/10) — Warren’s attacks on his “wine cave” fund-raisers drew blood. He still acquitted himself well as a centrist Democrat with a more realistic outlook than the candidates to his left.

Miriam Pawel (4/10) — Points for composure in the face of jabs — even from Bernie! — at his inexperience, fund-raising and insider-outsider persona. But it’s hard to recover from Wine Cave Pete.

Melanye Price (7/10) — He has learned so much on race. These were some of the best answers on race in all of the debates. If he had done this three months ago, he would be in a different place now. He should run for governor or senator, get more experience and try again.

Mimi Swartz (9/10) — Proved he had done a lot of thinking about the Israelis, the Chinese and Elizabeth Warren. Made wine caves sound like a good thing. The gay dude in Mike Pence’s Indiana kept his dukes up and landed serious punches.

Héctor Tobar (7/10) — A Kennedy-esque presidential candidate from a PG-13 movie. So smart and never a wasted word. But after awhile, his answers sounded too practiced and polished. I trusted him less after the first half hour, but he did offer a flawless impression of a young, talented and empathetic leader.

Will Wilkinson (6/10) — The mayor of Indiana’s fourth-largest municipality got seriously bloodied on wine cave fund-raisers and a paucity of relevant experience, but honey-tongued defensive maneuvers left him on his feet.

Andrew Yang6.3/10Average score

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Has improved onstage, even if he remains a one-note candidate.

— Jamelle Bouie

Charismatic and competent.

— Bianca Vivion Brooks

Seems most comfortable, perhaps because he knows he cannot win.

— Jorge Castañeda

No big breakthrough.

— Gail Collins

Strong start, slow fade.

— Ross Douthat

Not clear he’s got anything more than his “freedom dividends.”

— Nicole Hemmer

The only candidate emphasizing that the problem is larger than Trump.

— Nicholas Kristof

New York’s next governor?

— David Leonhardt

Math, thorium and books!

— Liz Mair

We’ve heard all his fresh ideas by now.

— Daniel McCarthy

His publisher will be happy!

— Miriam Pawel

Still unclear what his presidency would look like beyond the economy.

— Melanye Price

Freedom Dividend still sounds like a reach.

— Mimi Swartz

After Bernie, he gets the silver medal for authenticity.

— Héctor Tobar

He’ll be back.

— Will Wilkinson

Jamelle Bouie (7/10) — Yang has improved onstage, even if he remains a one-note candidate. He continues to raise important issues and to sell universal basic income as the solution to every problem the country might face. At least he’s consistent.

Bianca Vivion Brooks (7/10) — He was as charismatic and competent as ever, but it’s still not enough to win.

Jorge Castañeda (9/10) — He was outstanding early on, then seemed to fade. He gave the best answer on the forgiveness question and seems most comfortable, perhaps because he knows he cannot win.

Gail Collins (5/10) — Still cool, but no big breakthrough.

Ross Douthat (5/10) — Strong start, slow fade. I enjoy him, but I don’t see how he grows beyond the #YangGang.

Nicole Hemmer (5/10) — Yang is loose and entertaining onstage, but it’s not clear he’s got anything more than his “freedom dividends,” this year’s 9-9-9 plan.

Nicholas Kristof (9/10) — Elegantly mixes intelligence and humor, the only candidate emphasizing that the problem is larger than Trump and concerns millions of Americans left behind.

David Leonhardt (6/10) — He’s grown on me over these debates, but he’s not going to be president. New York’s next governor, perhaps?

Liz Mair (6.5/10) — He had good moments and brings a much-needed non-politician perspective. He was probably most effective in advocating for math, generating book sales, getting people to Google “thorium” and learn about new-fangled nuclear reactors. Which ain’t nothing.

Daniel McCarthy (4/10) — Yang gets laughs by asking why he’s onstage with these other candidates, but at his point the joke is too real. He’s meant to be a candidate of fresh ideas, but if you’ve watched his past performances, you’ve heard them all by now.

Miriam Pawel (3/10) — Articulate and disarming as usual, but not a factor. But his publisher will be happy!

Melanye Price (8/10) — Yang is clearly very smart and interesting but it is still unclear what his presidency would look like beyond the economy. His discussion of the role the lack of diversity plays in being able to gather money for candidates of color was a shining moment.

Mimi Swartz (6/10) — Proved he’s been doing his homework and learned from his mistakes. He spoke with heartfelt authority on China and special needs kids, but the Freedom Dividend still sounds like a reach.

Héctor Tobar (7/10) — His wonkishness reminded me of an early Bill Clinton. Almost every answer he rattled off another statistic or policy plan. After Bernie, he gets the silver medal for authenticity.

Will Wilkinson (7/10) — By stepping back from his usual Freedom Dividend monomania, the most consistently human candidate onstage was able to give the most consistently interesting answers. He’ll be back.

Tom Steyer4.8/10Average score

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On the periphery of most of the conversations.

— Jamelle Bouie

There are better uses of his time.

— Bianca Vivion Brooks

Had to shine, being an outsider, but didn’t.

— Jorge Castañeda

Uninspiring.

— Gail Collins

Slightly more plausible tonight.

— Ross Douthat

The Democratic Party needs to tweak its process.

— Nicole Hemmer

Still seemed the weakest presence onstage.

— Nicholas Kristof

Could be doing so many other things.

— David Leonhardt

Used his billions to create grass-roots movements.

— Liz Mair

Cory Booker should be onstage, not Steyer.

— Daniel McCarthy

He repped California.

— Miriam Pawel

He believes that the only way to beat a fake billionaire is to run a real billionaire. It’s an odd calculation.

— Melanye Price

A Bloomberg-Steyer bakeoff?

— Mimi Swartz

He didn’t look like a debater.

— Héctor Tobar

Unusually coherent.

— Will Wilkinson

Jamelle Bouie (6/10) — Steyer has gotten much better at the debate game and much better at giving clear, concise answers. But he still doesn’t seem like he has the political skills to go toe-to-toe with his rivals, putting him on the periphery of most of the conversations and disputes.

Bianca Vivion Brooks (4/10) — He spent the debate explaining all the great things he was doing when he wasn’t running for president, and they all seemed like a better use of his time.

Jorge Castañeda (7/10) — He had to shine, being an outsider, and didn’t. On climate change and not fighting among Democrats he excelled, but it was not enough.

Gail Collins (1/10) — Attention Bloomberg: Billionaire candidates need to sound like something more inspiring than … a liberal billionaire.

Ross Douthat (3/10) — Seemed slightly more plausible than in past appearances, which isn’t saying much.

Nicole Hemmer (4/10) — Judy Woodruff didn’t seem to know who he was, and most voters don’t either. That he’s onstage instead of Cory Booker or Julian Castro makes the case that the Democratic Party needs to tweak its process.

Nicholas Kristof (6/10) — Smart, articulate and more forceful than in previous debates, but still seemed the weakest presence onstage.

David Leonhardt (5/10) — Steyer is a force for good who doesn’t need to be on this stage. He could be doing so many other things to help beat Trump. His tie was fun.

Liz Mair (5/10) — Steyer did better than expected, but the competition was also tougher. He talked so much about having used his billions to build grass-roots movements, I was honestly surprised he didn’t mention having built one focused on disability rights.

Daniel McCarthy (2/10) — He’s passionate about climate change, but so is every other candidate. His occasional emphasis on economic growth is welcome, but that’s a message Cory Booker delivers better, and he’s the one who should be onstage.

Miriam Pawel (4/10) — For the guy on the periphery, he was articulate in framing some major issues and gets points as the only one who took Trump’s racism head-on. Plus he repped California.

Melanye Price (7/10) — He believes that the only way to beat a fake billionaire is to run a real billionaire. It’s an odd calculation.

Mimi Swartz (7/10) — Benefited from the smaller field and proved his case. I would like to see a Bloomberg-Steyer bakeoff. Did he really call China a frenemy?

Héctor Tobar (5/10) — His lack of political experience really showed: He didn’t look like a debater. But his comments on the racism behind Trump’s immigration rhetoric were the absolute highlight of the debate for me.

Will Wilkinson (6/10) — This was Steyer’s best debate. He was unusually coherent, articulate and humane, but nevertheless superfluous.

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About the authors

Jamelle Bouie, Gail Collins, Ross Douthat and Nicholas Kristof, and David Leonhardt are Times columnists.

Bianca Vivion Brooks is a writer based in Harlem and the host of the weekly culture podcast, “Ask Viv.

Jorge Castañeda (@JorgeGCastaneda), Mexico’s foreign minister from 2000 to 2003, is a professor at New York University and the author of “Utopia Unarmed: The Latin American Left After the Cold War” and a contributing opinion writer.

Nicole Hemmer (@pastpunditry) is an associate research scholar at Columbia University and the author of “Messengers of the Right: Conservative Media and the Transformation of American Politics.”

Daniel McCarthy (@ToryAnarchist) is the editor of Modern Age: A Conservative Quarterly.

Liz Mair (@LizMair), a strategist for campaigns by Scott Walker, Roy Blunt, Rand Paul, Carly Fiorina and Rick Perry, is the founder and president of Mair Strategies.

Miriam Pawel (@miriampawel) is the author of “The Browns of California: The Family Dynasty That Transformed a State and Shaped a Nation” and a contributing opinion writer.

Melanye Price (@ProfMTP), a professor of political science at Prairie View A&M University in Texas, is the author, most recently, of “The Race Whisperer: Barack Obama and the Political Uses of Race.”

Mimi Swartz (@mimiswartz), an executive editor at Texas Monthly, is a contributing opinion writer.

Héctor Tobar (@TobarWriter), an associate professor at the University of California, Irvine, is the author of “Deep Down Dark: The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free” and a contributing opinion writer.

Will Wilkinson (@willwilkinson) is the vice president for research at the Niskanen Center.

21 diciembre, 2019

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1 year ago
TLC: ¿ya mero?

Hoy en #Amarres escribo “TLC: ¿ya mero?”; vía EL FINANCIERO👇

Jorge G. Castañeda opina que, en la negociación del TLCAN, la parte mexicana ha procurado siempre mostrar tramposamente la mejor cara para proteger el tipo de cambio.

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